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    1. CNESMAG 85- Exploring life's origins:the ultimate quest

      Publishing date:

      July 24, 2020

      Where did life come from? Are we alone in the universe? These two closely related questions have reached beyond the realm of philosophy and are now being subjected to scientific investigation in more precise terms. Attempting to answer them is like putting together a jigsaw puzzle in which each piece lies at the end of a treasure hunt. This summer, three space missions are set to depart for Mars in search of new clues to solve this rebus.Thanks to the sum of talents of the scientists, engineers and technicians working in our research laboratories, agencies and private firms, Europe and France are pivotal players in this fantastic quest to discover our origins and, in the final analysis, reveal the reasons behind our existence.

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    2. Life on Mars- Curiosity rover identifies methane and numerous organic molecules

      Publishing date:

      June 8, 2018

      Thursday 8 June, the journal Science announced that the Curiosity rover, using its SAM instrument operated from the Toulouse Space Centre in France, has identified methane and numerous organic molecules on Mars.

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    3. [Cinéma] Life: Origine inconnue, 3 scènes vraisemblables (ou pas)...

      Publishing date:

      June 7, 2017

      Le film de science-fiction horrifique, « Life : Origine inconnue », du réalisateur suédois, Daniel Espinosa, comporte quelques scènes très réalistes, d’autres moins… Nous avons demandé leur avis à nos experts.

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    6. Key compound of the origin of life formed in laboratory conditions

      Publishing date:

      April 8, 2016

      Researchers have shown for the first time that ribose, a sugar that is one of the building blocks of genetic material in living organisms, may have formed in cometary ices.

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    7. Le CNES au Symposium du COSPAR « Water and Life in the Universe »- Préparation du volet spatial de la COP21

      Publishing date:

      November 10, 2015

      Le CNES participe cette semaine au Symposium du COSPAR « Water and Life in the Universe » qui réunit du 9 au 13 novembre, à Foz do Iguaçu (Brésil), la communauté mondiale des scientifiques de l’espace. Jean-Yves Le Gall, Président du CNES, a participé à l’inauguration de cet événement le 9 novembre, dans le cadre de la préparation du volet spatial de la COP21.

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    8. CNES at the COSPAR Symposium ‘Water and Life in the Universe’- Preparing the space agenda for COP21

      Publishing date:

      November 10, 2015

      CNES is at the COSPAR Symposium, ‘Water and Life in the Universe’, which is bringing together the world’s space science community this week at Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil. CNES President Jean-Yves Le Gall took part in the opening of this event on 9 November as part of preparations for the space agenda of the COP21 climate conference.

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    9. 2008: traces of life in a meteorite could withstand an atmospheric re-entry

      Source:

      • Sciences et techniques

      Publishing date:

      October 3, 2011

      2008 TRACES OF LIFE IN A METEORITE COULD WITHSTAND AN ATMOSPHERIC RE-ENTRY Update: 10/03/2011

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    10. One step closer to the cosmic origins of life

      Publishing date:

      November 23, 2010

      The IAS space astrophysics institute in Orsay, with support from CNES, has shown that organic matter from space may have played a key role in the appearance of life on Earth.

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    11. The emergence of life on Earth

      Publishing date:

      August 6, 2003

      Earth is estimated to have formed about 4.5 billion years ago. Life first appeared less than a billion years later, in the form of primitive aquatic organisms much like modern-day bacteria. These organisms set off processes such as photosynthesis and vegetable decomposition that had a profound impact on their environment.

    12. “We need Philae to learn more about the origins of life”

      Publishing date:

      June 18, 2015

      Francis Rocard, in charge of solar system exploration programmes at CNES, reacts to the news that contact has been regained with Philae.

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    13. Molecular building blocks of primitive life in an artificial comet

      Source:

      • Sciences et techniques

      Publishing date:

      March 12, 2012

      The first molecules of life naturally occur in comets: that is what the French-German works achieved by the groups of Uwe Meierhenrich and Cornelia Meinert from the Institute of chemistry of Nice (Sophia Antipolis University of Nice/CNRS) and of Louis Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt from the Institute of Space Astrophysics (Paris-Sud University/CNRS) suggest.

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    14. The life of a satellite

      Publishing date:

      August 6, 2003

      A satellite begins its life in space tucked inside the launcher fairing, which shields it from friction forces during ascent through the atmosphere. Mounted on a small attach fitting, it separates from the launcher by means of a pyrotechnic and spring-loaded release mechanisms on reaching its intended transfer orbit.

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    17. Léopold Eyharts will bring Columbus to life

      Publishing date:

      December 27, 2006

      A former test pilot and an astronaut since 1990, Léopold Eyharts is now training for his 2nd spaceflight, on the STS-122 mission of the U.S. Space Shuttle Discovery in October, which will be carrying Europe’s Columbus laboratory to the International Space Station. Eyharts will be staying on board the ISS for 2 months to oversee activation and checkout of the laboratory.

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    18. AMINO to probe the origins of life

      Publishing date:

      December 2, 2008

      The 3rd exobiology experiment devised by the LISA laboratory in Créteil, France, supported by CNES, lifted off on board a Russian Soyuz launcher on 26 November. Called AMINO, it aims to study the viability of certain organic molecules in space, like for example those found in comets.

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