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  1. Rosetta mission Watch the climax of the space odyssey live

    Publishing date:

    September 27, 2016

    Its multiple twists and scientific discoveries have kept us on the edge of our seats. Now, in a final flourish, ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft is set to bring its mission to a close with a controlled descent to the surface of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Friday 30 September. Impact is scheduled within a window 20 minutes either side of 13:20 CET. CNES invites you to watch the finale of this space odyssey live at the Cité des sciences et de l’industrie in Paris, the Cité de l’espace in Toulouse and on its website.

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  2. Rosetta mission science results A fifth of Earth’s atmosphere is likely from comets

    Publishing date:

    June 13, 2017

    Thanks to the Rosetta space mission to 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, which sought to gain new insights into how our solar system formed by analysing the comet and its behaviour as it approached the Sun, scientists have now determined that a fifth of Earth’s atmosphere likely comes from comets.

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  3. New results from Rosetta raise questions about the formation of comets in the Solar System

    Publishing date:

    May 23, 2017

    The ROSINA mass spectrometer from the Rosetta mission isn’t quite finished with its discoveries: according to new results, the prominent theory on comet formation may have been wrong.

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  4. Still a slim chance of restoring contact with Philae

    Publishing date:

    February 12, 2016

    Although Philae remains a castaway on its comet more than 200 million km from Earth, there is still a chance that contact with ESA’s Rosetta mission lander might be restored.

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  5. Chances of restoring contact with Philae fade

    Publishing date:

    January 14, 2016

    There’s still no response from Philae after ESA recently commanded its reaction wheel to spin in an attempt to move the lander.

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  6. “We need Philae to learn more about the origins of life”

    Publishing date:

    June 18, 2015

    Francis Rocard, in charge of solar system exploration programmes at CNES, reacts to the news that contact has been regained with Philae.

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  7. The asteroid Lutetia, a small piece of Earth

    Source:

    • Sciences et techniques

    Publishing date:

    October 27, 2011

    A study carried out using data obtained by the ESA's Rosetta probe disclosed that the asteroid Lutetia could be a remnant of the Earth formation and could have been ejected towards the asteroid belt during the rocky planet formations.

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  8. Agenda of the rendez-vous with the comet

    Publishing date:

    November 7, 2014

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  9. CNESMAG 71- Rosetta-Philae, the adventure continues

    Publishing date:

    February 7, 2017
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    For certain, the Rosetta mission that ended last September with the orbiter impacting the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko after a controlled descent will mark the history of space exploration. Having achieved numerous firsts, collected a wealth of data and made major discoveries, this ambitious mission—a veritable space odyssey, given the length of its journey and the operational obstacles it had to overcome— has indisputably been a huge success.

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  10. Interview: Comet Dust in Earth’s Atmosphere

    Publishing date:

    June 12, 2017

    Even after its mission ended, the Rosetta probe is still teaching us a lot about comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. On 9th June, Bernard Marty from the Centre de recherches pétrographiques et géochimiques (joint institute between the CNRS and the University of Lorraine) and his colleagues from the Rosina consortium (PI: K. Altwegg) published new results in Science, showing a quantitative link between comets and our planet’s atmosphere.

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  11. So long, Rosetta!

    Publishing date:

    September 30, 2016

    All good things must come to an end, including space missions… Rosetta, Europe’s favourite space mission that has been making headlines since 2004, bowed out today in a moment of pure poetry when the orbiter landed softly on the surface of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta and Philae will now remain forever in an eternal slumber, leaving behind for the public and the international space community a legacy of unforgettable feats and a treasure trove of science data.

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  12. The water-ice cycle on the comet "Tchouri"

    Publishing date:

    October 8, 2015

    From data supplied by ESA's probe Rosetta about 67P/Tchourioumov-Guerassimenko comet, scientists bring the first observational proof of an existing daily cycle of water-ice on the surface of the comet.

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  13. Rosetta severs link with Philae

    Publishing date:

    July 27, 2016

    The Electrical Support System (ESS) through which the Rosetta orbiter has been listening out for Philae will be turned off Wednesday 27 July at 11 a.m. CEST. The remaining supply of power, now ever dwindling as comet Churyumov-Gersimenko moves further away from the Sun, will be used to complete the final phases of the mission.

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  14. Rosetta et la matière organique des comètes

    Publishing date:

    October 4, 2017

    Il y a un an le 30 septembre 2016, la sonde Rosetta terminait sa mission autour de la comète 67P. D’après une étude basée sur ses résultats et parue le 31 août dans la revue MNRAS, les comètes sont constituées en grande partie de matière organique (constituées de chaînes d’atomes de carbone), à partir de molécules présentes dans le milieu interstellaire. Son auteur Jean-Loup Bertaux est planétologue, directeur de recherche émérite au CNRS au Latmos (Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales), nous en avons discuté avec lui.

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  15. Rosetta mission extended 9 months

    Publishing date:

    June 23, 2015

    ESA has confirmed the extension of the Rosetta mission for 9 months until September 2016. The orbiter’s trajectory could also be altered to set it down on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

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  16. Bilan scientifique de la mission Rosetta Un cinquième de l’atmosphère de la Terre proviendrait des comètes

    Publishing date:

    June 13, 2017

    Grâce à la mission Rosetta, dont l’objectif principal a été de mieux comprendre comment notre système solaire s’est formé, en analysant la comète 67P Churyumov Gerasimenko et son comportement à l’approche du Soleil, nous savons maintenant qu’un cinquième de l’atmosphère de la Terre proviendrait des comètes.

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  17. Rosetta still listening out for Philae

    Publishing date:

    February 12, 2016

    After its trailblazing successful landing on 12 November 2014, Philae spent two and a half days collecting in-situ measurements and observations on the surface of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a first for science and a notable contribution to ESA’s record-setting mission. Despite the lander’s continuing silence and uncertainties about its current position, there is still a chance of restoring contact between Philae and Rosetta in the months ahead.

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  18. Tchouri soulève la question des conditions de formation des comètes

    Publishing date:

    May 23, 2017

    Le spectromètre de masse ROSINA de la mission Rosetta n’en finit pas d’alimenter les découvertes : les comètes n’ont pas pu se former comme il est généralement admis.

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  19. International Symposium Comets: A New Vision after Rosetta-Philae Toulouse, Monday 14 to Friday 18 November

    Publishing date:

    November 14, 2016

    The international symposium on ‘Comets: A New Vision after Rosetta-Philae’ is being held from Monday 14 to Friday 18 November at the Musée des Abattoirs in Toulouse, organized by CNES, ESA and the IRAP astrophysics and planetology research institute.

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  20. We’ve found Philae!

    Publishing date:

    June 11, 2015

    After months of searching, the teams at the LAM astrophysics laboratory in Marseilles and the SONC (Science Operations and Navigation Centre) in Toulouse, working with scientists involved in the CONSERT and ROMAP instruments, have found what they believe is the Philae lander, released onto the surface of comet 67P on 12 November 2014.

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